Please review the following guides before attempting to install Panel Bricks.

Interior Application Video:

Exterior Application Video:

Stone Panel Installation

Basic Steps to Get Started

5 Steps to Installing Panel Bricks

Panel Brick is a ½” kiln-fired clay brick. Applying the ½” brick is a simple process and, when completed, has the look and wear of a genuine brick wall. Before starting your Panel Brick install project, gather the following materials and tools.

  • tile nippers
  • trowel
  • chalk line
  • 5 gallon pail
  • soft bristle brush
  • tape measure
  • baker’s bag
  • striker.

Here are the basic steps to applying Panel Brick:

Step 1. Snap a chalk line on your wall every 11” (4 rows of brick). Work from the bottom of your wall to the top. Alternating rows should start with a half brick. Brick can be cut with offset carbide tipped tile nippers, a saw with a masonry blade, or a tile cutter with a carbide wheel.

Step 2. Butter the back of each brick and push the brick into place in the wall (if going over a wood surface, apply a skincoat of adhesive over the entire surface before adhering the brick). Leave ½” mortar joints between the brick (mortar joints may vary from 3/8” to 5/8”). When all bricks are in place and adhesive has dried, mortar and finish the joints between the brick.

Step 3. Thoroughly mix the grout with water. Use approximately 1 gallon water per 80 lb bag. The thickness or consistency of the mortar is important. It should be able to flow through the bag easily, but stay in the joint. A good test is to put your hand in the bucket, squeeze the mortar through your fingers and be able to turn your fingers and be able to turn your hand over and the mortar shouldn’t drop off. When mixing a mortar color with the grout, do not use more that ½ of a box of dye for every 80 lbs. of mortar, and mix the dye and mortar in a dry state.

Step 4. Fill the baker’s bag with mortar (make sure the metal tip is in place) and while holding the bag at a 45 degree angle, twist the bag so the mortar will flow out. Be careful not to get mortar on the face of the brick. If you do, don’t wipe immediately, wait until it turns stiff and then brush it off or scrape it with a putty knife. After mortar is in the wall, it will begin to set up.

Step 5. Next, strike the excess mortar off the joints. When you see the moisture around The edge of the brick and the mortar becomes crumbly, start to strike. Don’t let the mortar get too hard. Always strike the vertical joints first, then come back and finish off the horizontals. Wait until the mortar has turned stiff, then brush with a soft bristle brush.

You’re done, step back and admire your brick wall. Thanks for using Panel Brick.

Preparing the Panels

NEW CONSTRUCTION

WOOD STUDDING 

Studding must be 16” on center. Panels must hit 4 studs with 12 fasteners per panel penetrating 1” into the substrate. It is recommended to use a ½” support material over studding, then panels over the supports material with fasteners penetrating 1” into substrate.

METAL STUDDING

Same procedures and recommendations as with wood studding using self-tapping screws penetrating 1” into substrate.

NOTE: IF STUDDING IS NOT 16” ON CENTER, A ½” SUPPORT material MUST be used over the studding, panels can then be applied like a solid wall, hitting studs whenever possible. Whenever plywood is used as a support material, plywood should be EXTERIOR GRADE.

EXISTING SURFACES

BRICK: If brick and mortar joints are in good condition, SF-450 adhesive can be applied to the existing brick joints, panels can then be screwed into the mortar joints with tap con screws or equivalent penetrating 1” if possible. If brick and mortar joints are not in good shape, fir out with wood or metal strips.

CONCRETE BLOCK: If concrete block is painted, paint must be removed. Apply 3 vertical strips of SF-450 adhesive to the back of the panel, then secure panel with 9-12 screws or equal screwed into mortar joints of the block.

POURED CONCRETE: Same procedures and recommendations as with concrete block, securing panels with screws driven into concrete.

WOOD LAP SIDING: Most of the time, wood lap siding will have to be removed to give a smooth surface for the panels. Panels can then be applied with screws.

ASPHALT SHINGLES: Shingles must be removed, panels then applied accordingly.

ALUMINUM SIDING: Aluminum siding must be removed, panels then applied accordingly.

ASBESTOS SHINGLES:  If surface is good and flat, panels can be applied directly over the shingles with screws. If surface is not flat shingles must be removed, panels then applied accordingly.

Applying the Panels

Please note, a Moisture Barrier is Required. 

  1. Cut extra pieces of ½” backer board into 4 ¾” x 16” sections. (for corner trim)
  2. Starting at the corner, screw the trim strips 16” side, flush with the corner line.
  3. Screw the strips from the bottom chalk line (excluding the ¾” channel line) to the soffit.
  4. Align a PANEL with the chalk line, placing the end flush against the trim strip.
  5. Screw the first half of the panel with at least NINE SCREWS.
  6. Pull the second half of the panel (not yet screwed) slightly away from the wall and interlock with the second panel.
  7. Press the panels against the wall, checking the alignment of both panel tops with the chalk line.
  8. Screw the second half of the first panel.
  9. Re-align the second panel with the chalk line and screw the first half.
  10. Repeat steps 4 through 7 until reaching end of wall.

Use one of the following three recommended methods for joining the PANELS at the corners:

Step #1   Cut the panel with a masonry saw, and screw it using recommended interlocking procedure laid out in steps 4 through 7 above.

Step #2  

A. Interlock the last panel and screw it up, allowing the panel to protrude past the corner.

B. Using a razor knife, cut the backing board flush with the second wall.

C. Bend the panel back toward the second wall. The backer board will break along the cut. (Trim excess or uneven parts flush.)

Step #3   

A. Score the back of the panel with a razor knife at a point flush with the second wall.

B. Using a claw hammer or similar tool, pry brick from the backer board   along  the cut.

C. Screw the panel completely to the wall, breaking the portion protruding beyond the corner.

11.  Place a brick corner against the trimmed panel for flush fit.

12. Screw a piece of 4 ½” wide trim board to the second wall, making sure the lead edge is flush with the face of the backer board on the first wall. Check the following alignments.

A.     The 4 ½” edge is aligned with the top of panel chalk line.

B.     16 ½” edge is flush with the front edge of the backing material.

13. Repeat instructions 1 through 6 to near the center of the wall.

 ****By this point, the installer should have a good working knowledge of the PANEL and the installation techniques particular to the material, and should be ready for the Panel installation on the front wall of the structure.

14. Return to your original starting point (the front corner,) start the bottom panel row, working in the opposite direction to the point where the seam will be located.

NOTE:  Upon completion of the lower course of PANELS and prior to applying the second row, remember Each panel should be supported on the wall by nine (9) or more fasteners driven through the panel into the wall behind the panel. The lower course of PANELS is NOT a foundation, nor is it intended to support the next row above it.

STRICT ATTENTION TO GRADE LINES IS NECESSARY FOR EACH PANEL AS IT IS APPLIED.

Applying the Mortar

Thoroughly mix the grout with water. Use approximately one gallon of water per 80 lbs of mortar. The thickness or consistency of the mortar is important. It should be able to flow through the bag easily, but stay in the joint when applying. A good test is to stick your hand in the bucket and squeeze the mortar through your fingers; you should be able to turn your hand over and the mortar should not drop off. When mixing a mortar dye with the mortar, do not use more than ½ the box of dye for every 80 lbs. of mortar. Also, be sure to mix the dye and mortar in a dry state.

Fill the baker’s bag with the mortar (make sure the metal tip is in the bag) and while holding the bag at a 45 degree angle, squeeze the bag so the mortar will flow out of the tip. Be careful not to get any mortar on the face of the brick. If you don’t wipe it off immediately, wait until it turns stiff then scrape it off with a putty knife. After the mortar is in the wall it will start to set up.

When you see the moisture darkening the edge of the brick around the mortar and the mortar becomes crumbly to the touch, start to strike the vertical joints then come back and strike the horizontal joints. Wait until the mortar becomes hard, and then brush with a soft bristle brush.